The Ponzi

Michael Franklin Jr., a struggling stockbroker is trying to lead a normal, middle-town life but he has more pressure than he can handle – seemingly from all sides. His father, a superstar broker in his time, gives him his book of business just at the onset of one of the worst bear markets in history, and continues to chastise him as he has his entire life. Trying to manage dad’s former clients as best he can, Michael proceeds to lose one after another while a co-worker tries to stab him in the back for personal gain.

Ultimately, Michael is fired due to lack of production/assets. His girlfriend, who has an undisclosed checkered history herself, decides to step in and take control by coming up with the Ponzi idea. She has to “sell” Michael on the merits of the plan. She says it is done all of the time in different forms. Telling him that he has had his chance to “provide” for them and that now it is her turn she threatens to leave him if he doesn’t go along with her idea.

As other things in Michael’s life collapse, he comes to believe that he has nothing else to lose.

Ultimately, he must decide whether he will turn himself in to save others including a victim he has fallen deeply in love with, or choose the ultimate, and final, escape.

REVIEWS

Readers’ Thoughts

In “The Ponzi” by P.T. Dawkins, stockbroker Michael Franklin, Jr. is having a rough time at work. Unable to achieve financial gain for his clients during hard times, he begins losing them. These valued clients were handed to him by his father when he retired. Appearing ineffectual to his father, superiors and colleagues, his career is in danger. When things finally hit bottom for him, his girlfriend Jennifer has an idea that he believes will help him achieve both financial success and gain the respect of others. Jennifer has a history that she hides from Michael. Using her adept skills at deceiving people, she brings Michael into her plot, without him realizing that he is to be one of her marks. Angela is an abused housewife of a successful businessman. Things come to a head for her when her husband almost kills her during one of his rages. Realizing that she will die if she doesn’t take drastic action, she has to act quickly. Her actions result in her coming into a great deal of wealth. This attracts Jennifer’s attention. Sending Michael to do whatever it takes to get his hands on her money, Angela finds herself drawn to him. Michael becomes confused about who his loyalty should be with. As the story plays out, untruths are revealed and Michael discovers the full impact of Jennifer’s plan. Realizing that she has created a Ponzi scheme that will devastate others, he is torn about what he should do. Jennifer has made sure that he will be fully implicated when the truth comes out. The time has come for Michael to create his own scheme. I totally enjoyed reading “The Ponzi” by P.T. Dawkins. It is incredibly well written, with subplots and vivid characters, I found myself totally caught up in it. I also gained a greater understanding of how people allow themselves to get caught up in schemes that involve greed and being told what they want to hear. This was clearly happening in this story. In spite of his gullibility, Michael’s character is likable because he has a good heart. It was fun to see how he decides to extricate himself from this mess. I highly recommend reading “The Ponzi.” This is one book you won’t want to put down.

Reviewed by Paige Lovitt for Reader Views

In P.T. Dawkins’s “The Ponzi”, Michael Franklin Junior is steadily losing his father’s clients; a young, honest broker that just couldn’t live up to his father’s name and refuses to use any of the old-timers’ method in the stock markets. His boss, Harry Lugarno, is trying to make him quit before the young Franklin drags him and other brokers down. To make matters worse, his girlfriend of two years, Jennifer – whose real name is Sandy Allen – is actually a felon, and she has a plan. It was hard for me to sympathize with Junior. The young broker is honest but hard-headed. His relationship with his father is more like rivalry between two brokers instead of what we see between a father and son. I love the author’s straightforward writing style. There is no unnecessary description; everything is to the point but still entertains and the dialogue is sharp. The great thing about “The Ponzi” is that P.T. Dawkins is able to tell a story while giving the readers an insider lesson in the investment world. Basing it on real life events, Dawkins draws on real happenings, and stays true to the natural lingo of each character, which makes all of their experiences more real to the reader. To conclude, “The Ponzi” is a novel that will engage and entertain readers. It is one of those books that make you want to give it to the next person you come across, with a “you have to read this.”

July, 2013

Reviewed by Lit Amri for Readers’ Favorite

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